What to do when see a bear

what to do when see a bear

What to Do When You See a Black Bear

Jul 29,  · If a brown bear attacks, play dead. If a brown bear starts seeming agitated, take it very seriously. In the extremely rare case that a brown bear actually starts attacking you, that's when you need to play dead. "Lie flat on your stomach with your . The biggest—and perhaps the most famous—of Yosemite’s native wildlife is the American black bear. Many visitors to the national park hope to see a bear; many also fear such an encounter, haunted by lurid visions of nighttime campsite raids and oversized foaming-at-the-mouth bruins.

Black bears rarely become aggressive when encountered. NEVER run from a bear. However, if a bear does approach you, make yourself look big, make loud noises, clap your hands, and continue to back away. Bear Safety Tips. Leave any doors open as you back away from the bear.

Do not lock the bear in a room. When the bear leaves, remove potential attractants such as garbage, bird seed, or pet food. Ask neighbors to remove attractants. Check your yard for bears before letting out your dog. Then move away quietly in the opposite direction. Back away slowly in the opposite direction and wait for the bear to leave. If the bear approaches, follows or charges you, keep reading the sections below.

If a black bear becomes aggressive and…. Back away only when the bear stops its approach. Get your bear spray out of the holster and into your hand. Remove the safety latch. Intimidate the black bear by making how to break a dog from digging holes look bigger and making noise wave arms, shout, clap, bang stick. Stay together. Prepare to fight or use bear spray.

Remain calm. If you have bear spray, spray it directly at the bear. DO NOT play dead. Take Special Precautions to Avoid Bear Encounters when hiking, walking with your dog, camping or fishing in bear country.

How to avoid bear encounters. Top photo: Steve Uffman. Bear Safety Tips How to behave in a black bear encounter Keep bears out of homes and businesses Avoid bears while hiking, camping, fishing How and when to use bear spray Avoid bear encounters while hunting Secure your livestock, bees and crops Be BearWise in a vacation rental.

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Jul 29,  · Black bears are distributed across the U.S. in at least 40 states, while brown bears, including grizzly bears, tend to live in the Northwest and datingusaforall.com sometimes people enter into bear territory without a clue. What to do if you see either of these two main classes of bears is pretty similar - but with one key difference, which you'll need to know if the bear actually starts to attack. If you see a bear before it notices you: stand still, don’t approach and enjoy the moment. Then move away quietly in the opposite direction. If you encounter a bear that’s aware of you: don’t run; running may trigger a chase response. Back away slowly in the opposite direction and wait for the bear to leave. If you see a bear and the bear has noticed you. DO NOT RUN! Trust me, you cannot outrun a bear and you do not want the bear to consider you as prey; Stay calm; Talk to the bear (do not shout) and slowly wave your arms up and down to identify yourself as a human.

Seeing a bear in the wild is a special treat for any visitor to a national park. While it is an exciting moment, it is important to remember that bears in national parks are wild and can be dangerous. Their behavior is sometimes unpredictable. Although rare, attacks on humans have occurred, inflicting serious injuries and death. Each bear and each experience is unique; there is no single strategy that will work in all situations and that guarantees safety. Most bear encounters end without injury.

Following some basic guidelines may help to lessen the threat of danger. Your safety can depend on your ability to calm the bear. When you arrive in a park, always remember to check with the nearest visitor center or backcountry office for the latest bear safety information.

Following viewing etiquette is the first step to avoiding an encounter with a bear that could escalate into an attack. Keeping your distance and not surprising bears are some of the most important things you can do.

Most bears will avoid humans if they hear them coming. Pay attention to your surroundings and make a special effort to be noticeable if you are in an area with known bear activity or a good food source, such as berry bushes.

Once a bear has noticed you and is paying attention to you, additional strategies can help prevent the situation from escalating. Bear attacks are rare; most bears are only interested in protecting food, cubs, or their space. However, being mentally prepared can help you have the most effective reaction. Every situation is different, but below are guidelines on how brown bear attacks can differ from black bear attacks.

Help protect others by reporting all bear incidents to a park ranger immediately. Above all, keep your distance from bears! This kind of attack is very rare, but can be serious because it often means the bear is looking for food and sees you as prey. Bear pepper spray can be an important thing to carry when exploring the back country. It is used defensively to stop an aggressive, charging, or attacking bear.

Make sure you select an EPA approved product that is specifically designed to stop aggressive bears. It is not a repellent so do not apply to your body or equipment. Check with your national park to see if bear pepper spray is recommended or allowed for the activities you have planned. Learn more about selecting and using bear pepper spray in this introductory video or by visiting the Using Spray to Deter an Aggressive Bear page on Yellowstone's website.

Show 10 40 per page. Explore This Park. Staying Safe Around Bears. National parks in Alaska created a safety sticker to share steps for avoiding an unwelcome encounter with a bear. Avoiding an Encounter Following viewing etiquette is the first step to avoiding an encounter with a bear that could escalate into an attack. Bear Encounters Once a bear has noticed you and is paying attention to you, additional strategies can help prevent the situation from escalating. Identify yourself by talking calmly so the bear knows you are a human and not a prey animal.

Remain still; stand your ground but slowly wave your arms. Help the bear recognize you as a human. It may come closer or stand on its hind legs to get a better look or smell.

A standing bear is usually curious, not threatening. Stay calm and remember that most bears do not want to attack you; they usually just want to be left alone. Bears may bluff their way out of an encounter by charging and then turning away at the last second. Continue to talk to the bear in low tones; this will help you stay calmer, and it won't be threatening to the bear.

A scream or sudden movement may trigger an attack. Never imitate bear sounds or make a high-pitched squeal. Pick up small children immediately. Hike and travel in groups. Groups of people are usually noisier and smellier than a single person. Therefore, bears often become aware of groups of people at greater distances, and because of their cumulative size, groups are also intimidating to bears. Make yourselves look as large as possible for example, move to higher ground.

Do NOT allow the bear access to your food. Getting your food will only encourage the bear and make the problem worse for others. Do NOT drop your pack as it can provide protection for your back and prevent a bear from accessing your food. If the bear is stationary, move away slowly and sideways ; this allows you to keep an eye on the bear and avoid tripping. Moving sideways is also non-threatening to bears. Do NOT run, but if the bear follows, stop and hold your ground.

Bears can run as fast as a racehorse both uphill and down. Do NOT climb a tree. Both grizzlies and black bears can climb trees. Leave the area or take a detour. If this is impossible, wait until the bear moves away. Always leave the bear an escape route.

Be especially cautious if you see a female with cubs ; never place yourself between a mother and her cub, and never attempt to approach them.

The chances of an attack escalate greatly if she perceives you as a danger to her cubs. Bear Attacks Bear attacks are rare; most bears are only interested in protecting food, cubs, or their space. Spread your legs to make it harder for the bear to turn you over. Remain still until the bear leaves the area. Fighting back usually increases the intensity of such attacks. However, if the attack persists, fight back vigorously. Use whatever you have at hand to hit the bear in the face.

Try to escape to a secure place such as a car or building. Concentrate your kicks and blows on the bear's face and muzzle. Bear Pepper Spray Bear pepper spray can be an important thing to carry when exploring the back country. NPS photo. Tags: bears safety. Last updated: April 13, Tools Site Index.



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4 thoughts on “What to do when see a bear

  1. Jason Mcneely same that my only real complaint as well, they made mk too internet based. I also miss test your luck mode

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