What you reap is what you sow meaning

what you reap is what you sow meaning

You Reap What You Sow: Meaning and 10 Bible Verses

reap what you sow. If someone reaps what they sow, they suffer or benefit as a result of their own actions. Note: To reap a crop such as corn means to cut and gather it. Parents who neglect their children will reap what they sow. It seems to me that if we neglect these people in our society, we should expect to reap what we sow. Oct 02,  · You reap what you sow. To reap is “to gather a crop” and to sow, “to plant seeds.” Throughout scripture, sowing is used as a metaphor for one’s actions and reaping for the results of such actions. The biblical meaning of this phrase comes from a passage in Galatians.

What you reap is what you sow meaning use this phrase as a reminder to be kind and work hard. Although the phrase might have roots in early Christianity, it appears in some form in other religions and also can be applied in non-religious situations.

The general idea behind "you reap what you sow" is that actions will have consequences. Nevertheless, they show up eventually. People usually apply the reaping concept as a means of directing general living and working. The purpose is to encourage positive behavior and discourage negative activity, or to get a specific result. In this way, it serves as a means to move a person toward the thoughts and actions that are culturally accepted as being constructive, ethical and moral.

Specifically, the quote is found in Galatiansa book made up of letters written by Paul, a disciple of Christ. Galatia was a region located in how to create a shared task list in outlook 2010 is now Turkey. He wanted to teach them that God would reward them for doing the right thing and punish them for sins, if not in their mortal lives, in their eternal ones.

One reason Paul used a farming metaphor in his letters was that, at the time, most societies were heavily dependent on agriculture. Most members of a community were familiar with basic farming processes and schedules, and they had learned from experience what to expect from specific agricultural activities.

Communicating metaphorically made it easier for the Galatians to understand and accept what Paul was saying, just as stories had made it easier for Paul and the other disciples to understand and accept the messages of Jesus.

Today, even though many societies are more industrialized, the majority of people still grasp farming principles and can apply the concept just as early groups did. The idea of behavior having repercussions is not unique to Christianity. In Hinduism, for example, karma intrinsically is linked to the concept of getting back what one puts forward.

Reincarnation gives people an opportunity to continue to improve on their spiritual life, and any action in this life can have repercussions in the next. The fact that the concept works under so many different contexts means that it is applied even in situations that do not have any religious connotations at all. An employee, for example, might work hard at his job because he believes that his boss will reward his efforts with praise, a pay increase or other benefit.

Similarly, a geneticist can see that a specific DNA pattern yields predictable traits such as eye color, thereby leading him to arrange gene sequences together in a distinct order to get a desired genetic result. Some people appear to sow discord, dishonesty or other unenviable things and never pay for it.

Others who see this can experience spiritual, emotional and social crises, wondering how it is that bad people profit while good people suffer. If these crises are not addressed, they might cause a person to stop putting forth as much effort, or to cease engaging in good behaviors.

Societies therefore try to provide answers about why bad people can prosper. An answer individuals commonly give to resolve these crises is that life is simply not fair. This is often connected to the concept that nothing is perfect. Another response that how to build a basement window well cover more religiously based is that God or another higher power is waiting to punish the bad people in His own time, and that God can use even negative things for His glory.

She is especially passionate about reading and writing, although her other interests include medicine, art, film, history, politics, ethics, and religion. Tricia lives in How to remove asset tag California and is currently working on her first novel.

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Apr 18,  · In everyday speech, you reap what you sow is sometimes used after the fact, to indicate that someone should have expected the results that followed from their actions. In this use, it’s similar to I told you so. You reap what you sow has also been used to describe the Hindu and Buddhist concept of karma to westerners. Dec 11,  · In Hebrew, sow means “to conceive, to bear, or to yield,” and to reap means “to harvest.” Christians believe in redemption and follow a God Author: Angela Guzman. You reap what you sow means you get what you deserve, whatever you put your time, talent and energy into is what you get back. You reap what you sow means you must eventually face the consequences of your actions. The proverb you reap what you sow is .

See Today's Synonym. You reap what you sow is a proverb that says future consequences are inevitably shaped by present actions. An English sermon collection from , about forty years after the King James Bible was finished, frequently addressed the theme of metaphorical sowing and reaping, helping you reap what you sow achieve proverbial status.

The expression later came to be used outside of religious contexts, often in politics, business, and as general wisdom. In , the saying appeared in British Parliament. A ad in the Big Four Poultry Journal made the same comparison with regard to advertising.

Although you reap what you sow has spread well beyond religion and morality, the proverb still enjoys use in those contexts, especially owing to its biblical origins.

Today, you reap what sow is used in many contexts, from elevated religious and political discourse to pop culture and everyday speech. In a speech, Martin Luther King Jr. Not long! In everyday speech, you reap what you sow is sometimes used after the fact, to indicate that someone should have expected the results that followed from their actions.

You reap what you sow has also been used to describe the Hindu and Buddhist concept of karma to westerners. This is not meant to be a formal definition of you reap what you sow like most terms we define on Dictionary.

Previous Word you mad bro? Next Word you rock. Examples Origin Usage. Slang dictionary you reap what you sow [yoo reep wuht yoo soh ] What does you reap what you sow mean? What's hot. Where does you reap what you sow come from?

Examples of you reap what you sow You reap what you sow They can go off somewhere else and watch what happens to the magical Ferrari brand - and their share price. You reap what you sow and the arrogance of Ferrari in recent times will get what it deserves.

Armstrong Williams, Amsterdam News , June, Popular now. Who uses you reap what you sow? Note This is not meant to be a formal definition of you reap what you sow like most terms we define on Dictionary. Redefine your inbox with Dictionary. This field is for validation purposes and should be left unchanged.



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